3 Designers That’ll Get Your Creative Juices Flowing


Time is running out for you to submit your design for The Presets’ user-generated lyric video, ‘Tools Down’!

But there’s nothing like a looming deadline to stir the creative juices, and The Presets and Jonathan Zawada are expecting some high-quality entries to come flooding in before the 31st of March for Adobe x The Presets: Lyrical Masters. To help get those ideas flowing, we’ve handpicked a group of some of our favourite young artists, illustrators and designers to create their own take on a lyric of their choice, using the design brief provided by the competition big wigs. Below you’ll get an insight into the creative processes of our first batch of talented creators: versatile multi-disciplinary artist Nadia Hernández, colourful and kinetic artist and designer Kris Andrew Small, and playful illustrator and typographer Luke Day.

Kris Andrew Small

What’s the first thing you do when you receive a design brief? 

I always try and throw a rough idea together straight away, I normally have ideas quite quickly and like to get them started. I sleep on it and go back and develop it a bit further the next day. Then I just keep on going until I am happy with it (if I have time I like to sleep on it again before sending over to the client).

What’s the golden rule when dealing with a client?

Be nice and do the best job you can do. Keep in mind you should respect yourself, your work, your time and the client as well.

Why did you choose that particular lyric?

I felt like ‘Pump It Up’ has the most energy, a lot of my work is super energetic so I gravitated towards that phrase naturally. I could kind of see what I was going to do straight away when I saw those words.

What were your primary considerations in approaching your design for The Presets’ video?

I’ve been a big fan of The Presets since I was pretty young. I always looked to up to them so much and thought everything they made was so cool and so well done. I wanted to make something that they would see, and make them feel a similar way towards my work, in some small way.

What advice would you give yourself when you first started out? 

Don’t get too caught up in what everyone else is doing, do your own thing and work hard at it. Give yourself time to develop your style and don’t be afraid to put it out there in the world.

Any tips for other creatives entering work? 

You’re the only person that can make something happen, so figure out what you want to do and do it. Find what sets you apart and stick to that, work on it until you are happy and just start putting it out there and talking about it. Everyone starts somewhere, don’t be intimidated by people—they’re people too at the end of the day and were once in the same boat. Also, be nice to people!

Luke Day

What’s the first thing you do when you receive a design brief?

Read the brief thoroughly and ask questions.

What’s the golden rule when dealing with a client?

I don’t really have a golden rule, each client varies. Maybe just a bunch of little rules, like sound enthusiastic on the phone, be clear from the start by outlining each step of the process, don’t let the bastards get you down. Little things like that go a long way.

Why did you choose that particular lyric?

Because it was short and I originally planned on a more illustrative approach, but then I read the brief properly.

What were your primary considerations in approaching your design for The Presets’ video?

Colour, shape, layers and texture. I wanted to use those four things not only for the lyric itself, but to somehow get the feeling of what goes on in the music The Presets make. Also to make it legible… kinda got there in the end.

What advice would you give yourself when you first started out?

I don’t really like taking advice from anyone under 40, but if I had to, I suppose it would be don’t stress what everyone else is doing, you’ll figure it out along the way. Take your time.

Any tips for other creatives entering work?

See above.

Nadia Hernández

What’s the first thing you do when you receive a design brief?

The first thing I do is read the brief and in turn, ask questions about it. It sounds simple, but it’s easy to forget to outline the terms of the project at this stage and communicate with the client. I find that in moments of high workflow and stress all these pieces of advice go down the drain, but it’s important to remember your processes as a creative especially if you’re working for yourself.

What’s the golden rule when dealing with a client?

Over time and with experience you develop tools that make the creative exchange smoother, but the first word that comes to my mind is patience. When working with a client or collaborating with another artist you must have patience for one another. Have patience, listen, and communicate.

Why did you choose that particular lyric?

Because of the boldness and simplicity of the word.

What were your primary considerations in approaching your design for The Presets’ video?

I wanted to make a work that had impact, so chose to focus on two key elements: colour and contrast. Sometimes simplicity is key, it’s in deciding what ingredients to use…

What advice would you give yourself when you first started out?

Don’t be so hard on yourself. It’s okay to have a break. Don’t work too hard and look after your health. Don’t work on the weekends, read more books, spend less time on social media. (I think this is me talking to myself now, too.)

Any tips for other creatives entering work?

Learn to run a small business.

Head over to Adobe to find out more, or download the brief here to get moving on your design right now!

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