The Corduroy Hat is an Anomaly


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Corduroy is an anomaly, dude.

It was for centuries relegated to European noblemen, then somewhere ‘round the wake of the Industrial Revolution, became the garb of the working class due to its sturdiness and comfort, and probably in part because it looks so natural when covered in soot. Fast-forward to the mid-to-late-twentieth century and all the pseudo-intellectual beatnik acidheads are rocking it, along with a good healthy percentage of every “cool” professor ever. At some point, some logger somewhere, or truck driving fashionista, thought to make six-panel hats out of them, and that was arguably the greatest breakthrough in white trash attire to date. I don’t know anything about slacks or blazers with elbow pads, but as a black guy who has dressed like a hillbilly for all of his adult life—I know a shit load about corduroy trucker hats. The base level run-of-the-mill gas station iteration of the cord cap is nothing less than a delight to have on your head (think coonskin cap meets Fred Durst’s Kangol).  So when the UPS guy buzzed up with a fresh version of this Coal Headwear corduroy line, ooo baby, I was so giddy I damn near chundered all over his cute little shoes.

Featuring all kinds of natural staples like trout and snakes and the good ol’ soon-to-be-extinct American Bald Eagle, this series of corduroy truckers has a spirit animal for everyone. The cord is high-grade, the pattern and material of the interior feels like it’s made from the velveteen curtain of Twin Peaks’ White Lodge. It’s warm if you’re in a place that’s cold, it’s bearable in a place that’s hot. Either way, people who live in really hot places seem to wear beanies more than anyone else. Why is that?  You skaters in Cali look like you’re about to croak out there in all that wool. Coal Headwear Wilderness series: fit for your grandpa, your backward shoeless neighbor and his wife* (*sister). Shit—maybe even you!

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Find your spirit animal here.

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